Being Comfortable Being Bored

Being bored is something I hear a lot about in my day-to-day interactions with children. I hear “there is nothing to do,” “school is so boring,” and “everything besides my tablet is boring.” I am sure we have all heard this from our children, especially in today’s fast-paced world. What I remember from when I […]

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Parenting an Anxious Child

Parenting an Anxious Child

Fight, flight or freeze. Those are the typical responses to anxiety that most people have. When your child feels anxious, you may notice that your normally very rational child seems to become possessed, yelling and screaming and acting hysterical. Other children seem to dig in their heels and just not move. In general, children who […]

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child develop emotional coping skills

Stop Talking and Start Listening

Helping your Young Child Develop Emotional Coping Skills As adults, parents, or caregivers, we talk. A lot. We talk to our children in the morning to get them out of bed, we talk to our children about breakfast, we tell them what to do and what to stop doing, we give them praise, and we […]

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Making Mistakes

Getting Good at Making Mistakes: Developing a Growth Mindset

Some people will do anything to avoid making a mistake. They may decide not to embrace a challenge, for fear of failing or making a mistake, or they may spend tons of time and energy working towards a perfect product. Often times, these people are described as “perfectionists” and many of them experience a significant […]

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Mindful Parenting

Mindful Parenting

Being a psychologist who works with kids, people assume that I am an expert at parenting. Unfortunately, it’s not that easy. I have my own weaknesses, and parenting is really hard sometimes. One of the biggest lessons I have tried to apply to my parenting is something that use regularly when working to improve emotion […]

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Freedom in the Summertime

Summertime Freedoms: How Much to Give and When to Give It

Researchers are beginning to look at the ways young children spend their time and how it relates to the development of executive functioning skills such as time management and problem solving. Some early findings suggest that children who spend more time in less structured activities display better self-directed control. Summertime seems to be a great […]

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